Good Food Movement

 

Knowing where your food comes from matters.

 

Here’s why:

  • We’re putting on more weight
  • Our farmers are getting older
  • We’re losing food skills, fast
  • We’re wasting huge amounts of the food we grow, and
  • We’re further away from where our food grows than we’ve ever been.

 

By building a generation of young Australians who can cook, who can read a label, who understand the challenges facing farmers, who know the basics of how food grows and how it reaches our plate, we also build a generation of people that are healthier, more connected to our food and land, and better able to support farmers without it costing us the earth.

This is where the Good Food Movement comes in.

When you eat good food grown by family farmers, you know what you’re getting — honest, real food grown by people who care about their land, their community and their future. There is a large amount of support for local, organic, humanely-raised, family farm identified food! Today, more people than ever want to know where their food comes from, who grows it and how it was grown. This is the Good Food Movement!

There are so many benefits with local sustainably produced food. They’re obviously healthy, because it’s fresher if it’s grown closer to home and preferably organic. If they are grown without pesticides, it will have a positive impact on the local ecosystem.

But then also you’re reducing carbon footprints, you’re helping support family farmers, and you’re helping to support local economic development in those communities.

Buying local also preserves biodiversity – that is, the protection of our unique biodiversity and local food traditions. Because if we lose this there won’t be any good, clean and fair food available for anyone. Did you know that in the last 70 years, three quarters of the agro-biodiversity that was carefully nurtured by farmers over the previous 100,000 years worldwide has been destroyed?

Buying locally produced foods is the most direct way to support its continued growth.

By building a food system that relies heavily on locally grown foods it provides an answer to so many of our global problems, from environmental destruction to hunger. We also need a strong local food system if we’re ever going to rein in our out-of-control disease statistics, which are rooted in an unhealthy processed food diet.

Although the Good Food Movement started in the U.S. here are some Australian organisations doing their best to make a difference:

http://www.youthfoodmovement.org.au/about-us/

http://slowfoodaustralia.com.au/about-us/about-slowfood-australia/

http://fairfoodweek.org.au/about-afsa/

Most of these organisations campaign for changing the food system. There are well founded beliefs that our food system is broken and it is time to reconnect with where our food comes from and how we can grow food sustainably. These organisations campaign for a better food system by addressing issues such as Food Waste; Sustainable fishing; the need for transparent Food labelling; Fair prices for producers; GMO; the impact of Climate Change on our Food security; the impact of processed food on our health; soil welfare and the consequences of using chemicals and pesticides; saving our bees; the Australian supermarket dominance; the use of raw milk to produce artisan cheese; eating less meat; and many more.

They are also actively involved in teaching the next generation how to grow, prepare and share food responsibly. Whether it is sharing local knowledge on where to find the best local producers or restaurants, setting up school gardens, or being otherwise active in the local food scene: these organisations are prioritising wholesome, sustainable living over convenience.

But there is still much work to be done to strengthen and expand the Good Food Movement so that family farm food is affordable and available to all. Show your support by joining or participating with these organisations today! Each person can make a difference.

How can you include locally grown food in your meal planning and home cooking choices?