History of Iridology

Iridology research started in 1670 when Dr. Philippus Meyens published a paper describing the eyes of his patients when they became sick or injured. He also noticed changes in the eye that came with healing and was able to link points on the iris to specific parts of the body. By observing the eye, he was eventually able to identify areas in the body in need of support which would show up in the eye long before physical symptoms would manifest.

“Modern” Iridology got its start just over 100 years ago. In the late 1800’s, a physician from Hungary and another from Sweden began observing eyes and organizing their findings. This process of observation and correlating has been slow, but it established a foundation for others to build on. The first book on Iridology in USA, by an emigrated Austrian physician, was printed in 1904. This was followed by the works of N.D.s and other naturopathic oriented M.D.s.

Working with limited magnification and photography equipment, progress was difficult. Then with the emergence of the American Medical Association and other political and economic influences and the advent of “miracle” drugs, almost all natural medicine practices declined. Dr. Bernard Jensen is credited with keeping Iridology alive in North America.

In Europe, a different political and economic climate created an environment that has allowed Iridology (and other natural medicine practices) to evolve. Extensive research has been carried out in Europe and iridology is now widely accepted as a valuable preventative health care approach.