Benefits of Embracing Sunlight

Benefits of Embracing Sunlight

The sun’s light kills bad bacteria. The German soldiers in WWI knew of the discoveries that had been made in 1903 by the Nobel Prize winner in Medicine and Physiology, Niels Finsen. They used sunlight to disinfect and heal wounds.

Sunlight has a beneficial effect on skin disorders, such as psoriasis, acne, eczema and fungal infections of the skin.

Sunlight lowers cholesterol. The sun converts high cholesterol in the blood into steroid hormones and the sex hormones we need for reproduction. In the absence of sunlight, the opposite happens; substances convert to cholesterol.

The sun’s rays lower blood pressure. Even a single exposure significantly lowers blood pressure in individuals with high blood pressure.

Sunlight penetrates deep into the skin to cleanse the blood and blood vessels. Medical literature published in Europe showed that people with atherosclerosis (hardened arteries) improved with sun exposure.

Sunlight increases oxygen content in human blood. And, it also enhances the body’s capacity to deliver oxygen to the tissues; very similar to the effects of exercise. The sun has a great effect on stamina, fitness and muscular development.

Sunlight builds the immune system. The white blood cells, which increase with sun exposure, are called lymphocytes, and these play a major role in defending the body against infections.

Regular sunlight exposure increases the growth and height of children, especially babies. Many cultures throughout history have recognized this fact. Studies have shown the amount of sun exposure in the first few months has an effect on how tall the person grows.

Sunlight can cure depression. The noon sunshine can deliver 100,000 lux. When we sit in offices for the best part of the day, out of the sun, under neon and artificial lights (150-600 lux), we are depriving ourselves of the illumination of nature. Sunlight deprivation can cause a condition called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a form of depression. It is more common in winter months, but also common in people who work long hours in office buildings.

Other benefits of sunlight:

Food energy– In this way, sunlight provides the source of food for all life on earth.

Vitamin D– Sunlight provides us with Vitamin D. It is absorbed through the skin and converted to a state that the body can use. It usually only requires about thirty minutes of sunlight a day to acquire a minimum dose. Vitamin D is important for the creation and maintenance of bones. It is involved in the use of calcium in the body and performs many other important jobs.

Warmth– Life on this planet would not be possible without the warmth that the sun provides. A combination of the radiant light of the sun creating direct warmth and the atmosphere retaining and distributing that heat allows plant and animal life to thrive on this planet.

Light– We use it to plant our crops, find shelter from the predators of the night, and to pursue the things we enjoy most. Without the light of the sun, there would not be any life on earth.

Precipitation– If it was not for the sun evaporating the water off of bodies of water, we would not have rain or snow as we know it. The water that is turned to moist air rises into the atmosphere where it is affected by temperature to fall as the precipitation the temperature dictates. Without the sun, there would be droughts and most of the world would be a barren desert.

Viruses and infectious organisms like E.coli do not do thrive when exposed to the ultraviolet light of the sun.

Reduces heart disease– A STUDY in the British Medical Journal showed that people in the UK are more likely to die of heart disease in winter than in summer, which is believed to be because of low levels of vitamin D. Where you live in the UK also matters. Blackpool has 27 per cent more hours of sunshine a year than Burnley – and 9 per cent fewer deaths from coronary heart disease.

Helps prevent MS– Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system, leading to tremors and even paralysis. The cause is not known but scientists have noted that exposure to sunlight in childhood appears to dramatically reduce the risk of developing this disease in later life. Scientists have also noted that the incidence of MS is lower in sunnier countries.

Relieves aches and pains– Being out in the sun helps to warm the body’s muscles and eases stiffness, reducing the pain caused by inflammatory conditions such as arthritis.

Reduces risk of cancers– Although over exposure to the sun increases your risk of skin cancer, vitamin D provided by sunlight can actually help to significantly reduce your risk of other types of cancer.

A study carried out by the US National Cancer Institute found that people exposed to high levels of sunlight were significantly less likely to die from breast and colon cancer. A similar effect was seen in bladder, womb, and oesophagus and stomach cancer.

Boosts fertility– The sun reduces levels of the hormone melatonin which suppresses fertility, so it is more likely you’ll conceive in summer.

And sunlight not only makes you more fertile, it increases the length of your fertility. A study in Turkey discovered that women who get less than an hour of sunlight a week reach menopause seven to nine years earlier.

Sunlight also boosts testosterone levels in men, which makes summer the perfect time for baby-making.

Gives you more energy– Melatonin also regulates sleep, so having lower levels of this hormone in your body gives you more get up and go. This is why you need less sleep in summer but still feel livelier. Plus, being woken by natural light rather than an alarm clock helps you feel more positive.

Eases IBD– People with Crohn’s disease or other inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD) generally have low levels of vitamin D in their bodies, according to several studies. Sunlight is the best way to boost vitamin D in these cases.

Although Vitamin D is available in some foods (including meat, eggs, oily fish and some breakfast cereals), levels are low and poor absorption of fat – a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease – may make it difficult for sufferers to absorb vitamin D from their diet.

Beats period problems-About one in five women of childbearing age suffer from polycystic ovary disease which causes abnormal periods, unwanted body hair and infertility.

Half of 14 women treated with vitamin D and calcium by Dr Susan Thys-Jacobs at St Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, Columbia University in New York, recovered normal periods and two became pregnant. Dr Thys-Jacobs also found that women with premenstrual syndrome are likely to be deficient in vitamin D.

Helps you lose weight– Higher levels of serotonin in our bodies not only makes you feel happy but it also suppresses the appetite, so you’ll eat less in warmer weather.

The sunlight kills microbes. That’s why it is important to put out in the sun carpets, blankets and eiderdowns that cannot be washed regularly. Exposure to the sun confers the skin a bright, healthy look and increased elasticity.

The sun is good against insomnia. Daytime exposure to sunlight increases the melatonin production during the night. This hormone helps regulate the sleep.

They help the kidneys with a part of their job, as the sun waves favor the elimination of waste products through the skin, when we sweat.